"In fairy tales, monsters exist to be a manifestation of something that we need to understand, not only a problem we need to overcome, but also they need to represent, much like angels represent the beautiful, pure, eternal side of the human spirit, monsters need to represent a more tangible, more mortal side of being human: aging, decay, darkness and so forth. And I believe that monsters originally, when we were cavemen and you know, sitting around a fire, we needed to explain the birth of the sun and the death of the moon and the phases of the moon and rain and thunder. And we invented creatures that made sense of the world: a serpent that ate the sun, a creature that ate the moon, a man in the moon living there, things like that. And as we became more and more sophisticated and created sort of a social structure, the real enigmas started not to be outside. The rain and the thunder were logical now. But the real enigmas became social. All those impulses that we were repressing: cannibalism, murder, these things needed an explanation. The sex drive, the need to hunt, the need to kill, these things then became personified in monsters. Werewolves, vampires, ogres, this and that. I feel that monsters are here in our world to help us understand it. They are an essential part of a fable."

Guillermo Del Toro (via iwearthecheeseyo)

(via arabellesicardi)

"One reason that people have artist’s block is that they do not respect the law of dormancy in nature. Trees don’t produce fruit all year long, constantly. They have a point where they go dormant. And when you are in a dormant period creatively, if you can arrange your life to do the technical tasks that don’t take creativity, you are essentially preparing for the spring when it will all blossom again."

Marshall Vandruff (via cosmofilius)

(Source: karsenslater, via werealllfools)

(Source: briefmixofsenses, via arabellesicardi)

"In Southern Gothic, the most important concept is the grotesque. With the grotesque, reality is distorted into ugly and absurd shapes. “I use the grotesque the way I do because people are deaf and dumb and need help to see and hear,” Flannery O’Connor once said. By exaggerating reality, we are able to actually see it. The grotesque is a balance of contradictions. It creeps and crawls between repulsion and attraction, the real and the unreal, and humor and horror. The sublime floats in the mind, but the grotesque is experienced in the body—in turning stomachs, goose bumps, and sweat."

Lincoln Michel: Lush Rot - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics (via guernicamag)

(via arabellesicardi)

furples:

Dazed & Confuse Magazine March 2008
'Flower Power'
Jourdan Dunn by David Slijper

(via bodyfluids)

"I take pleasure in my transformations. I look quiet and consistent, but few know how many women there are in me."

Anais Nin  (via fernsandmoss)

this is my life in two sentences

(via silentnostalgia)

(Source: dreamsinthyme, via yourlifeisbutyourown)

werealllfools:

sickselkie:

  1. go to ocean
  2. find whale
  3. befriend whale
  4. marry whale
  5. whale bride
  6. eternal happiness

that is the life

"

For women, then, poetry is not a luxury. It is a vital necessity of our existence. It forms the quality of the light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action. Poetry is the way we help give names to the nameless so it can be thought. THe farthest horizons of our hopes and fears are cobbled by our poems, carved from the rock experiences of our daily lives.

As they become known to and accepted by us, our feelings and the honest exploration of them become sanctuaries and spawning grounds for the most radical and daring of ideas. They become a safe-house for that difference so necessary to change and the conceptualization of any meaningful action. Right now, I could name at least ten ideas I would have found intolerable or incomprehensible and frightening, except as they came after dreams and poems. This is not idle fantasy, but a disciplined attention to the true meaning of “it feels right to me.”

"

from “Poetry is Not a Luxury,” Audre Lorde (via commovente)

(via clementinevonradics)

(Source: aleksandrapopis, via moonbrains)